Culture Blog


Welcome to the Culture Blog, a comprehensive feed of engaging content, featuring work form over fifty leading sites on the topics of literature, art, photography, and film.

While this is something of a departure from the specifics of short fiction, we believe it’s important to acknowledge the intersection of the arts and appreciate that many of the best creations come from the blending of ideas.

We hope you’ll find things that will inform, entertain, and inspire.


  • A Brand New Interview with David Foster Wallace
    This discussion of postmodernism, translation, and the internet has never been published in EnglishPhoto by Matador the FirstEighteen years ago, writer and translator Eduardo Lago sat down with David Foster Wallace for a discussion that ranged from pedagogy to tennis to the influence of the internet on literature. The interview remained unpublished until Lago, an award-winning Spanish novelist, critic, and translator who teaches at Sarah Lawrence College, included it in his new book Walt Whitman ya no vive aquí, ten years after Wallace’s death. It has never been published before in English. The conversation has been lightly edited for readability.Eduardo Lago: I ...
    Source: Electric LiteraturePublished on 2018-11-16By Electric Literature
  • Why Stan Lee’s Death Is a Loss for Literature
    The comics giant didn’t just invent your favorite superheroes—he also expanded the definition of a readerPhoto by Gage SkidmoreStan Lee, the founder of Marvel comics, died this week at the age of 95. This is, of course, a huge loss to comics; many of Marvel’s most popular and enduring characters were Lee’s creations: Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor, the X-Men, the Hulk. But it’s also a loss to literature — because Lee helped pave the way for literature and comics to enrich each other.Lee’s success didn’t come from making the obvious choices. At a time when comics were championed by strapping, steadfast white men, Lee took ...
    Source: Electric LiteraturePublished on 2018-11-16By Carrie V Mullins
  • This Hawaiian Storytelling Chant Is Great Literature Without the Written Word
    The oli connects me to my childhood, and to the history of indigenous HawaiiA Hawaiian reverend blows on a pu before chanting the oli. (Photo via Air Force Medical Service)When I was much younger, every autumn I would join my mother and other healers from the Hawaiian cultural tradition to celebrate Makahiki, commonly known as the Hawaiian New Year. We collected at the ruins of an ancient fishing village on the Big Island. The once-thriving settlement is outlined by walls of lava rocks, tattered grasses, and maʻo, Hawaiian cotton trees. At each turn of the New Year, we would gather for ...
    Source: Electric LiteraturePublished on 2018-11-16By Wailana Kalama
  • Week in Review: Iranian Art Market Suffers After Oil Sanctions, Winnipeg Gallery Launches Indigenous Biennial
    Purvis Young, “Sometimes I Get Emotion from the Game” (early 1980s), 12 1/4 x 17 3/4 in. Acquired by the Morgan Library & Museum from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. (courtesy the Souls Grown Deep Foundation)Week in Review is a weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world. Subscribe to receive these posts as a weekly newsletter. The Souls Grown Deep Foundation has announced an acquisition agreement with the Brooklyn Museum, Dallas Museum of Art, The Morgan Library & Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and Spelman College Museum of Fine Art to help the institutions acquire works by artists of the African American South. The current ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-11-16By Jasmine Weber
  • A Japanese Illustrated History of America (1861): Features George Washington Punching Tigers, John Adams Slaying Snakes & Other Fantastic Scenes
    "George Washington (with bow and arrow) pictured alongside the Goddess of America" Though I'm American myself, I always learn the most about America when I look outside it. When I want to hear my homeland described or see it reflected, I seek out the perspective of anyone other than my fellow Americans. Given that I live in Korea, such perspectives aren't hard to come by, and every day here I learn something new — real or imagined — about the United States. But Japan, the next country over to the east, has a longer and arguably richer tradition of ...
    Source: Open CulturePublished on 2018-11-16By Colin Marshall
  • 8 Book and Netflix Original Series Pairings
    If you’ve been paying any attention, you know that Netflix is creating some of the most marathon-worthy original content these days. But once you’ve watched all available episodes of your favorite Netflix show, you can find yourself in a sad slump. What to do now? It’s too soon to start a new series, but you’re not ready to leave your cozy couch cocoon. Lucky for you, we’re here with eight book recommendations based on your favorite Netflix shows! These book and Netflix original series pairings are sure to help you end those last episode blues. The Chilling Adventures of ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Susie Dumond
  • Strategies For How to Protect Your Books
    I run a little free library, and while it is always inspiring and fun to be a part of getting books exchanged for free among neighbors and friends, I see a lot of books in bad repair. Think missing covers, torn pages, and everything bent in every which way. I’ve seen water damage, I’ve seen dirt, and I’ve seen books that have lost pages. While most of these books have a salvageable story to share still, it is pretty sad when a book has lost its use. Sometimes someone has simply read the book a hundred times. Other times, it’s ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Laura Marie
  • The Perils of Having a Toddler Who Adores Reading
    When I was pregnant, I had one fear (correction: I had many and still do but that’s parenthood, yaaay!): that my baby would not grow up loving books like I do. I know now how naive I was, how innocent and unsuspecting. But at the time, I did as any sane bibliophile would do: propped headphones to my belly to play him audiobooks. Once the little owl was born, I started strong with the book culture. I built him a bookshelf for his room, set aside space for him in the main “library” area of our home, diligently read every ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Alya Hameed
  • Did You Like That Book? Good, But It Did Not Like You
    Did you like that book you recently finished? You know, the one that you thought was ultimately about fear and resiliency? The one you told your book club really changed your “perspective on things”? The one you gave 5 stars to on Goodreads and then posted your review to Facebook with the caption: “Do yourself a favor”? You liked it? So glad to hear it. Unfortunately, it did not like you. via GIPHY It did not like how literally you took the part about the dog and his master. You thought that the dog “was a dog,” as ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Vivienne Woodward
  • Sick Lit: 5 Memoirs About Struggling with Illness
    I don’t look sick. But there are days, even whole weeks, when I can barely get out of bed. I have narcolepsy, a rare neurological disorder that causes perpetual exhaustion, muscle weakness, fits of uncontrollable sleep, and cataplexy attacks, which, though infrequent, cause me to collapse but not lose consciousness. For an avid reader, a chronic illness that keeps me in bed for days on end doesn’t sound so bad. The problem is that when I’m the sickest, I have terrible brain fog, and I can’t lift my arms. Not being able to think straight or lift a book can ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Rebecca Renner
  • The FRIENDS Episode With All The Book Suggestions
    We’ve been doing a rewatch of Friends at my house. We’ve done the first two seasons, where everybody has a lot of gel in their hair and some Outstanding Nineties Fashion Choices, and now we’re halfway through season 3. Richard and Monica have agreed to be just friends, Ross and Rachel are On A Break, and Joey’s been trying out some new reading choices.  As Little Women looks like it’s not coming out of the freezer any time soon (even though Beth doesn’t die *all* the time), he’s going to need some new reading soon—and, as ever, we aim to please. ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By LH Johnson
  • 50 Of The Best Historical Fiction Authors Writing Today
    The magical thing about historical fiction is the way it truly makes you feel like you’re experiencing life in another era. The best historical fiction authors are able to combine fictional characters with real settings and events in a way that makes it all feel visceral and current. What do we mean by best historical fiction authors? With countless amazing writers working in this genre, we went with the following criteria for our list: Does the author primarily write historical fiction, or do they write in numerous genres? Has the author published at least three works of historical fiction? ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Ann Foster
  • Reading Pathways: The Best Judy Blume Books
    Judy Blume was my generation’s J.K. Rowling. There may not have been wizards and owls, but Judy Blume books held magic of a different kind: someone who got us. Someone who wrote about the things that we actually worried about. Someone who made us feel grown up by writing about things that we didn’t always completely understand, but that we knew were coming for us in the next year, or in two years, or hopefully, maybe one day, at some undefined point. Someone who made us want to read: all her books, and then all the others in the world. Generations ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Claire Handscombe
  • 15 Bookish Gifts For The Whole Family
    Though your heart may be in the right place when searching for the perfect gifts for everyone in your family this December, let’s be real. Having more than a handful of family members to buy for during the holiday season can be very time consuming and expensive. But don’t fret, Book Riot has your back. Singular gifts for the whole family are always a great way to save time and money during the holiday shopping season. Below is a list of 15 bookish themed gifts across all price levels that your whole family will enjoy. Note: All prices shown are ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Selina Falcon
  • Anthologize Me, Netflix
    Two major Netflix adaptations were announced this week: a new version of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, directed by Ben Wheatley and starring Lily James and Armie Hammer, and a series adaptation of Wild Cards, the long-running (seriously, 1987–present) anthology series edited by George R.R. Martin (you may have heard of him). I am pretty excited about Rebecca, pending proper casting for Mrs. Danvers, but what I really want to talk about is Wild Cards. I read the first book in the late ’90s and fell madly in love, only to read on in the series and fall right back out ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2018-11-16By Annika Barranti Klein