Culture Blog


Welcome to the Culture Blog, a comprehensive feed of engaging content, featuring work form over fifty leading sites on the topics of literature, art, photography, and film.

While this is something of a departure from the specifics of short fiction, we believe it’s important to acknowledge the intersection of the arts and appreciate that many of the best creations come from the blending of ideas.

We hope you’ll find things that will inform, entertain, and inspire.


  • Confronting Our Fears of Looking at the Unknown
    Macon Reed, Who Is Watching You More Than You Are Watching You (2018) at the Knockdown Center (photo by Kalaija Mallery)Experiencing Macon Reed’s art can feel like walking into an old-fashioned candy store. Known for creating immersive sculptural installations, the artist’s use of bright, saturated colors give her work an unapologetically attractive quality. I was first introduced to Reed in 2015 through her project “Eulogy for the Dyke Bar” at the Wayfarers Gallery in Brooklyn, where she created her own dyke bar to lament the increasing disappearance of lesbian spaces all across the United States. There is a modest tradition of artists ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-07-18By Ksenia M. Soboleva
  • The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Amy Fusselman
    The Rumpus Book Club chats with Amy Fusselman about her new book, Idiophone (Coffee House Press, July 2018), exploring consciousness in writing, and, of course, The Nutcracker. This is an edited transcript of the book club discussion. Every month The Rumpus Book Club hosts a discussion online with the book club members and the author, and we post an edited version online as an interview. To become a member of the Rumpus Book Club, click here. Upcoming writers include Nicole Chung, Idra Novey, Tom Barbash, Esmé Weijun Wang, and more. And, through July 31, purchase a 6-month Rumpus Book Club subscription (or a yearly Letters in the Mail subscription) and ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2018-07-18By The Rumpus Book Club
  • A Cartoonist on the Pleasures of Painting Big Pictures
    Vanessa Davis: Wiggle Room continues at ArtMovement LA (2049 S Santa Fe Ave, Los Angeles) through August 13. The post A Cartoonist on the Pleasures of Painting Big Pictures appeared first on Hyperallergic. ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-07-18By Jack Sjogren
  • Dead Girls, Female Murderers, and Megan Abbott’s Novel “Give Me Your Hand”
    Katy Waldman writes about Megan Abbott’s new novel, “Give Me Your Hand,” the BBC’s “Killing Eve,” and the tropes of female victimhood in fiction. ...
    Source: The New YorkerPublished on 2018-07-18By Katy Waldman
  • The Handwriting of Famous People
    The Romans were among the first to develop a written script, and their penmanship was round and even. In the Middle Ages, the price of parchment soared, and handwriting, accordingly, became small and condensed. Years later, in the eighteenth century, elegant handwriting became a sign of refinement. Later still, in the twentieth century, American schools taught a standardized cursive by encouraging students to draw loopy letters through horizontal lines. Now hardly anyone writes anything at all. Through September 16, the Morgan Library and Museum is showcasing the handwriting of more than a hundred major artists, authors, composers, and historical figures ...
    Source: The Paris ReviewPublished on 2018-07-18By The Paris Review
  • The Handwriting of Famous People
    The Romans were among the first to develop a written script, and their penmanship was round and even. In the Middle Ages, the price of parchment soared, and handwriting, accordingly, became small and condensed. Years later, in the 18th century, elegant handwriting became a sign of refinement. Later still, in the 20th century, American schools taught a standardized cursive by encouraging students to draw loopy letters through horizontal lines. Now hardly anyone writes anything at all. Through September 16, the Morgan Library and Museum is showcasing the handwriting of over 100 major artists, authors, composers, and historical figures drawn from ...
    Source: The Paris ReviewPublished on 2018-07-18By The Paris Review
  • Notable San Francisco: 7/18–7/24
    Wednesday 7/18:  Lyrics & Dirges: A monthly reading series. Free, 7:30 p.m., Pegasus Books (Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley). Poetry with Jane Gregory and Claire Marie Stancek. Free, 7 p.m., Mrs. Dalloway’s Books (Berkeley). Christina Alger reads from her new novel The Banker’s Wife. Free, 11:30 a.m., Town Centre Books (Pleasanton). Heather June Gibbons reads from her new poetry collection Her Mouth as Souvenir. Free, 7:30 p.m., The Bindery (SF). Kelli María Korducki discusses her new book Hard to Do: The Surprising Feminist History of Breaking Up. Free, 7:30 p.m., Green Apple Books on the Park (SF). Thursday 7/19: AfroSurreal reading ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2018-07-18By Chuy Haugen Mendeola
  • From Hystorians to Bolex Dudes: The Many Descendants of Barbara Hammer
    LAST AUTUMN, New York Film Festival kicked off an international retrospective of works by the prolific experimental filmmaker Barbara Hammer. For 50 years, Hammer has devoted herself to unapologetically exhuming, assembling, and celebrating the lesbian image as no one has before. Her films, produced in 1974, 1997, and 2015, stage lesbians as unabashed hippie separatists, a Jewish sculptor thriving during the Occupation (Claude Cahun), and a Pulitzer Prize–winning poet (Elizabeth Bishop). More than a hundred moving pictures later, many newly restored, there’s never been a better time to know Barbara Hammer — as much as one can, anyway. As Hammer ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2018-07-18By Cord Brooks
  • Still Happening: A Conversation with Ed Sanders
    KNOWN FOR HIS ROLE in the avant-garde mimeograph revolution, New American poetry, ’60s social justice movements, and his intermedia Beatnik-proto-punk band, The Fugs, Ed Sanders weds political pragmatism with media shamanism. As we celebrate the anniversary of May 1968 and the release of Sanders’s new “investigative poem,” Broken Glory: The Final Years of Robert F. Kennedy, his reflections offer insight for our hyper-militarized and hyper-mediatized political moment. The following conversation was recorded at the Burchfield Penney Art Center on April 12, 2018, where Sanders premiered a new musical play based on Cassandra, the prophetess of the Trojan War that no ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2018-07-18By Cord Brooks
  • The Angry Baby Trump Balloon Is Coming to America
    The German TV show called, “Heute Show” recently photoshopped Trump Baby into a series of photos from President Trump’s recent visit to Europe. (image via @heuteshow)The protest baby blimp with inexplicable chest hair is officially coming to the United States to troll President Donald Trump on his home turf. Literally. New Jersey activists are planning to fly the angry Baby Trump balloon near the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, where the President spends many of his summer weekends. Jim Girvan, one of the organizers, told CNN that they’ve gotten permission from UK activists to make their own balloons from ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-07-18By Zachary Small
  • Full Stop Quarterly: Limits and Listening
    When one listens, one opens oneself to the world. ...
    Source: Full StopPublished on 2018-07-18By The Editors
  • Multi-Dimensional Illustrations Weave Together Mysterious Narratives by Victo Ngai
    Los Angeles-based illustrator and storyboard artist Victo Ngai produces layered illustrations that reveal elaborate worlds filled with unexpected details. A beautiful expanse of unencumbered nature stands guarded inside a wide-mouthed bullfrog, while a seaside city burns with brilliant flames in the fabric of a heroine’s dress. Each scene inspires the viewer to pause, making sure they haven’t missed a key character that might unlock the work’s tangled narrative. Ngai is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, and provides illustrations for clients such as The New York Times and The New Yorker. You can view more of her colorful ...
    Source: ColossalPublished on 2018-07-18By Kate Sierzputowski
  • A Day in the Life of an Indie Publisher: Akashic Books
    At 4:45 a.m., Ibrahim Ahmad’s alarm clock began pouring out the first bars of Leonard Cohen’s “Lullaby”—“Sleep, baby, sleep. The day’s on the run. The wind in the trees is talking in tongues…” With this bit of counterintuitive programming, another long day in the life of an independent publisher had begun. After a quick breakfast and an industrial-strength quadruple espresso, Ahmad and his wife, Cassie Carothers, left their home in exurban Yorktown Heights, N.Y., and boarded a train that would carry them from the northern fringe of Cheever country to Grand Central Terminal in midtown Manhattan. For many of their ...
    Source: The MillionsPublished on 2018-07-18By Bill Morris
  • Explore Cyberspace in an Immersive Exhibition Series
    A viewer entranced by one of the many immersive video installations on display at 3LD’s .Zip: DEVELOPING THE FUTURE (photo by Xiao Quan, image courtesy 3-Legged Dog)(image courtesy 3-Legged Dog)Instead of delivering us the utopian techno-future that supposedly awaits us in cyberspace, this year Silicon Valley has found itself at the center of about a dozen narratives of dystopian disaster. Cambridge Analytica exploiting Facebook user data for the presidential election. Google receiving fines of $5.1 billion USD for antitrust violations in the European Union. Discovering that Elon Musk was a top Republican donor and that he called the Thai cave rescue hero ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-07-18By Zachary Small
  • Glenn Gould Is Always on Fast-Forward
    Revisited is a series in which writers look back on a work of art they first encountered long ago. Here, Katharine Kilalea revisits Glenn Gould playing Bach’s Partita No. 1 in B-Flat Major.   Glenn Gould in the studio in 1978   Driving home from the swimming pool one day, I listened to famous people on the radio describing themselves as either happy or unhappy. They preferred, on the whole, to say, “I choose to be happy,” which irritated me, so I switched to another station which was playing Bach’s Partita No. 1 in B-Flat Major. The partita’s gigue—meaning jig—had a ...
    Source: The Paris ReviewPublished on 2018-07-18By Katharine Kilalea