Culture Blog


Welcome to the Culture Blog, a comprehensive feed of engaging content, featuring work form over fifty leading sites on the topics of literature, art, photography, and film.

While this is something of a departure from the specifics of short fiction, we believe it’s important to acknowledge the intersection of the arts and appreciate that many of the best creations come from the blending of ideas.

We hope you’ll find things that will inform, entertain, and inspire.


  • A 17-Story Dragon Climbs Thailand’s Pink 80-Meter Buddhist Temple
    via @nicopicz The Samphran district of Thailand hold’s one of the most unique Buddhist temples found in the country. The bright pink temple, called Wat Samphran, stands 17-stories high and is wrapped in a scaly green dragon. The design of the structure came to the founder of the temple during a 7-day fasting meditation, and is built 80 meters tall to honor the number of years that Buddha lived. Visitors can climb the great building and touch the dragon’s beard or large talons from an access point on the roof. You can get a 360 perspective on the gigantic temple ...
    Source: ColossalPublished on 2017-12-18By Kate Sierzputowski
  • The Not Yorker: A Collection of Rejected & Late Cover Submissions to The New Yorker
    What's happened to the thousands of cover designs that have been submitted to The New Yorker? And then been rejected, either summarily or with much consideration? Probably most have faded into oblivion. But at least some are now seeing the light of day over at The Not Yorker, a web site that collects "declined or late cover submissions" to the storied magazine. See a gallery of declined illustrations here. The creators of the new site encourage illustrators to submit their rejected covers here. And lest there be any doubt, The Not Yorker is not officially affiliated with The New Yorker. Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your ...
    Source: Open CulturePublished on 2017-12-18By Dan Colman
  • Next Letter in the Mail: Caroline Leavitt
    Our next Letter in the Mail comes from bestselling author Caroline Leavitt! Caroline writes a wonderful letter, perfect for the holiday season, about how she changed from being cruel and sharp-tongued to being a kind, generous, and openhearted person. Letters in the Mail is the gift that keeps on giving throughout the year! Our 6-month gift subscriptions, available only during the holidays, make the perfect present for bookworms on your list. And, Letters in the Mail helps us keep The Rumpus running—so, you and your loved ones can correspond with your favorite writers and support the website in one fell swoop. All subscription orders placed before ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2017-12-18By The Rumpus
  • Puerto Rico Sketchbook: There Are Dead in the Fields
    In November, the artist and writer Molly Crabapple spent a week in Puerto Rico documenting grassroots efforts by communities to rebuild after Hurricane Maria. Here are excerpts from her sketchbook. © Molly Crabapple Maria passed and they said“Puerto Rico, se levanta!”We’re gonna see. We’re gonna see.  A cantastoria is a vagabond fusion of art and music, so old it turns up all over the world.  In each set, a performer displays an illustrated scroll, then, while pointing to each image with a stick, tells a story in song.  The cantastoria first developed in India as a way for itinerant performers to bring the ...
    Source: The Paris ReviewPublished on 2017-12-18By Molly Crabapple
  • Where It Happened: Documenting the American Places We’d Like to Forget
    WE DRIVE and walk every day over the places where somebody once wept or bled; the earth is a repository of invisible pain. Only in extremely rare instances are these places deemed historically important enough to be commemorated, and only in harmony with contemporary politics that can identify clear moral contours. Think of the secular holy ground of the World Trade Center site, the swan-white memorial over the wreck of the USS Arizona, the marble obelisks looming over any number of Revolutionary War battlefields. But what of those places that are too ethically ambiguous or nationally embarrassing to remember? Does ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2017-12-18By Cord Brooks
  • Public Space? Lost and Found
    Public Space? Lost and Found, edited by Gediminas Urbonas, Ann Lui and Lucas Freeman. On amazon USA and UK. Publisher MIT Press writes: “Public space” is a potent and contentious topic among artists, architects, and cultural producers. Public Space? Lost and Found considers the role of aesthetic practices within the construction, identification, and critique of shared territories, and how artists or architects—the “antennae of the race”—can heighten our awareness of rapidly changing formulations of public space in the age of digital media, vast ecological crises, and civic uprisings. Public Space? Lost and Found combines significant recent projects in art ...
    Source: We Make Art Not MoneyPublished on 2017-12-18By Regine
  • A Year in Reading: Patrick Nathan
    On January 1st, I wrote in my notebook that it was “time to renew my usual promises and take artificial, arbitrary steps toward bettering myself and living a different life.” I made a list of aspirations, which included things like “Return writing to its centerpiece in your life,” and “Reduce temptations for distraction.” Fortunately, aspirations always take place in the future tense. I did, however, “read widely and daily,” and came close to learning “constantly.” Despite—or perhaps because of—2017’s relentlessness, I’ve read more books this year than any previous, and I do feel changed, somewhat, because of it. Seeing—a subject ...
    Source: The MillionsPublished on 2017-12-18By Patrick Nathan
  • Ten Aphorisms from the Russian Revolution
    Marina Tsvetaeva   Marina Tsvetaeva is one of Russia’s most acclaimed twentieth-century poets. She was born in Moscow, in 1892, to a classicist father and a pianist mother. She published her first book of poems at the age of seventeen. She lived through, and wrote about, the Russian Revolution and the Moscow famine that followed. In 1922, Tsvetaeva and her husband, Sergei Efron, along with two of their children, fled Russia. They lived in increasing poverty in Paris, Berlin, and Prague. In 1939, they returned to Moscow, and two years later, in 1941, her husband and daughter were arrested on espionage charges. Her husband was executed and her ...
    Source: The Paris ReviewPublished on 2017-12-18By Marina Tsvetaeva
  • Book Riot’s Deals of the Day for December 18th, 2017
    Smash the patriarchy this holiday season with great gifts for your favorite females from Running Press. Give the gifts of confidence, creativity, humor, magic, and self-care with books for every woman in your life: Today’s Featured Deals The Book of Strange New Things by Michael Faber for $1.99. Get it here or just click the cover image below: Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel for $3.99. Get it here or just click the cover image below:   In Case You Missed Yesterday’s Most Popular Deal   The Force by Don Winslow for $3.99. Get it here, or ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2017-12-18By Jeff O'Neal
  • The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Season One
    This week on Dear Television: Phillip Maciak, Jane Hu, and Aaron Bady get drunk, ride the subway, and take the microphone from a spoken-word poet in order to tell you about Amazon’s new series, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. There are some spoilers below, so if you don’t want to get arrested, don’t say the f-word on stage.  Perfect Manhattan by Phil Maciak Dear television, The other day, Aaron (who will join us below) tweeted this: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is way better than you guys are admitting.” I don’t have data to support his claim, but it had also occurred to me that the ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2017-12-18By Phil Maciak
  • Striking Silverware Animal Assemblages by Matt Wilson
    South-Carolina based artist Matt Wilson brings old silverware to life in his bent and welded sculptures of birds and other wildlife. Fastened to pieces of driftwood or mounted to segments of old lumber, the pieces seem to capture the lifelike essence of the robins, owls, and sea creatures they represent despite a minimal number of components. Wilson has an uncanny ability to let the found objects in his pieces speak for themselves, adapting the natural curvature of spoons and forks into folded wings and long tails. You can explore more of his work on Instagram and in his Etsy ...
    Source: ColossalPublished on 2017-12-18By Christopher Jobson
  • Jared Kushner Adopts A Family
    Image: IIP Photo Archive via Flickr JARED needs to use the bathroom, very badly. He’s nervous because he hasn’t used the one at work yet, even though he’s been employed at the White House for a year now, longer if you count the transition, which, depending on which lawyer you talk to, definitely counts. IVANKA is reclining on her new fainting couch and scrawling notes on SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS’s press materials. She’s not speaking to her since she began referring to herself professionally as “Sarah Sanders.” GENERAL MATTIS, still dressed as Santa Claus, enters. KUSHNER DAUGHTER has joined him. She’s ...
    Source: The AwlPublished on 2017-12-18By silvia
  • We’re Alive, This Isn’t Hell, and in 2018 You Might Have to Do Something About It
    Image: Stefano via Flickr/small> “Are we dead and is this Hell?” —Ghost of Gary Probably not and no. Reality isn’t changing. We’re just allowing people to make us think it’s changed. It’s as if everything that has happened before has evaporated away. Not that everything was all that great. But everything now possibly minus the stock market is decidedly not great. And what we’re left with is a tall glass of brown gunk. Which they will try to convince you is delicious lemonade. It is not. It never was and never will be. You will just have to be strong ...
    Source: The AwlPublished on 2017-12-18By silvia
  • The Subletter
    ...
    Source: The AwlPublished on 2017-12-18By silvia
  • Thelonious Monk’s 25 Tips for Musicians (1960)
    Stories of idiosyncratic and demanding composers and bandleaders abound in mid-century jazz—of pioneers who pushed their musicians to new heights and in entirely new directions through seeming sheer force of will. Miles Davis’ name inevitably comes up in such discussions. Davis was “not a patient man,” jazz historian Dan Morgenstern remarks, “and I think he got impatient with himself just as he did with other people.” Jazz and other forms of music have been immeasurably enriched by that impatience. Other bop eccentrics—like John Coltrane—brought their own personality quirks and personal struggles to bear on their styles, pushing toward new ...
    Source: Open CulturePublished on 2017-12-18By Josh Jones