Culture Blog


Welcome to the Culture Blog, a comprehensive feed of engaging content, featuring work form over fifty leading sites on the topics of literature, art, photography, and film.

While this is something of a departure from the specifics of short fiction, we believe it’s important to acknowledge the intersection of the arts and appreciate that many of the best creations come from the blending of ideas.

We hope you’ll find things that will inform, entertain, and inspire.


  • Come Down
    A Sci Fi VFX Short Film set in a dystopian future fuelled by amphetamines and constant trance music. COME DOWN is a dystopian Sci Fi short film set in a futuristic city constantly consumed by rave music. Everyday life is a monotonous, never ending bender. The streets covered with thumping speakers, neon lights and tough, authoritarian law enforcement. The citizens of the city are encouraged to continually take psychoactive substances, something heavily regulated. The most illegal object to have in your possession? …headphones, or any paraphernalia that can block out sound and give you peace. Joe is an inhabitant of ...
    Source: Film ShortagePublished on 2017-10-17By Admin
  • A Poem by Sophie Robinson
    This week, a poem by Sophie Robinson.   biggest loser   ok so stupid feelings will take their hold at this moment & every. like the whole time i say i’m anything but angry i’m covering or feeling sorry enough for you to pretend i wasn’t full of rage from the beginning. five years old a boy touched my future cunt i mean just some flesh but i knew he touched it & i thought a while came into school & decided no sir him face ...
    Source: Lambda Literary ReviewPublished on 2017-10-17By Poetry Editor
  • Talking About the Challenges and Benefits of Arts Programs for Prisoners
    Martín Ramírez at DeWitt State Hospital with Dr. Tarmo Pasto ((C) the Estate of Martín Ramírez, image courtesy Ricco/Maresca Gallery, New York)The inaugural exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles surveys the work of Martín Ramírez, a Mexican immigrant who spent the last 30 years of his life detained in California psychiatric hospitals, diagnosed — erroneously most likely — with schizophrenia. During this period, he produced a visionary body of drawings, signs of resistance against an unsympathetic and unjust correctional system. This show provides the backdrop for a discussion at the ICA on the purposes, challenges, and benefits ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-17By Matt Stromberg
  • After Purging Her Possessions, an Artist Paints What Remained
    Possession by Jaye Schlesinger, installation view (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic unless otherwise noted)ANN ARBOR, Mich. — The word “possession” carries multiple meanings, signifying both an object under ownership and the state of being in the thrall of a dominant force. Capitalism thrives on material consumption, and we are driven as a society to constantly express ourselves through our possessions, even as many of us find ourselves in crushing debt to maintain them. While there’s been a recent trend to minimize one’s possessions, it’s merely a part of a larger cycle of purging, inherent to an unhealthy relationship with ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-16By Sarah Rose Sharp
  • A Film Gathers a Beloved Brazilian Artist’s Intimate Audio Diaries
    A Paixão de JL (2015), directed by Carlos Nader (image courtesy Projeto Leonilson and Itaú Cultural)In 1990, just three years before he died, the Brazilian artist José Leonilson began recording an audio diary on cassette tapes. In a melancholic tone, he reflected on the banalities of life, his anxieties about coming out to his family, and the haunting images of his dreams. Over the course of recording these tapes, Leonilson would discover he was HIV positive, lending this daily exercise a new and troubling meaning. A Paixão de JL (2015), directed by Carlos Nader (image courtesy Projeto Leonilson and Itaú Cultural)While a ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-16By Elisa Wouk Almino
  • New York City, October 15, 2017
    ★ The humid, gloomy morning seemed to be breaking apart, as the forecast said it would, around 11. Buildings shone in the distance. By noon, though, the light had shut off again. Without the sun, the breeze in the forecourt was clammy. Leaves tossed; debris blew. A motorcycle bore down on a pigeon, which reluctantly took flight. At great intervals a drop of rain would fall. The children rode around for a while on a scooter and the balance bike, despite the dimness, still wearing shorts for the day they’d been told about, the better part that never arrived. Neither the ...
    Source: The AwlPublished on 2017-10-16By tscocca
  • How Do I Pitch to a Publication?
    A guest post by Karen Andrews Like many who work in the creative fields, I’ve worn many hats over my career: writer, blogger, editor, arts worker, publisher, teacher, mentor . . . the list goes… The post How Do I Pitch to a Publication? appeared first on Aerogramme Writers' Studio. ...
    Source: Aerosmith BlogPublished on 2017-10-16By Aerogramme Writers' Studio
  • Richard Wilbur in The New Yorker
    Hannah Aizenman writes a remembrance of the poet and New Yorker contributor Richard Wilbur, who died last weekend, at ninety-six. ...
    Source: The New YorkerPublished on 2017-10-16By Hannah Aizenman
  • The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts Welcomes Visitors to its Open Studios, October 19–21
    EFA Open Studios 2017 is an annual event of the EFA Studio Program, which invites the public to explore and interact with over 70 member artists in their studios. It is an opportunity to see artwork in development and gain meaningful insight into the individual creative practices of our artists. This event showcases EFA’s vibrant and diverse community of contemporary artists working in a wide range of media and artistic sensibilities. Rarely can one see so many internationally recognized artists working under the same roof in Manhattan. DATES: Thursday, October 19, 6–10 pm (opening night) Friday, October 20, 6–9pm Saturday, ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-16By Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts (EFA)
  • US Civil Rights Sites and Aleppo’s Old Souk Among 25 Threatened Places Around the World
    India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi: The Hall of Nations, a complex of exhibition halls built for the 1972 International Trade Fair, was demolished in April 2017. (photo by Ariel Huber, Lausanne/World Monuments Fund)Today the World Monuments Fund (WMF) announced the 2018 World Monuments Watch, listing 25 at-risk sites. Threatened by climate change, conflict, natural disasters, and preservation resource limitations, they range from modernist architecture to whole regions wrecked by hurricanes and earthquakes. The Watch was launched in 1996 and is released every two years, its list organized by a panel of heritage experts from around the world, including specialists in architecture, ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-16By Allison Meier
  • An Experimental Book Tests Our Ability to Perceive Multiple Mediums Simultaneously
    Pages from Nicolas Jaar’s Network (courtesy Nicolas Jaar/Printed Matter)Living up to its name, the book Network, a project by Chilean electronic musician Nicolas Jaar co-published by Printed Matter and Other People, can be opened at pretty much any point and read — if reading is even what you call it. Upon opening the book I saw a series of onomatopoeias, several pages featuring blocky text about wealth, a full-page spread of two hand-drawn Xs, some already filled out crosswords, multiple internet windows, and words arranged like numbers on a spreadsheet. Whatever you want call this, reading with Jaar is more akin to a cross ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-16By Paddy Johnson
  • What We’re Reading in November!
    We are thrilled to announce our November Book Club selection, Mouths Don’t Speak by Katia D. Ulysse (Akashic Books, January 2018)! No one was prepared for the massive earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010, taking over a quarter-million lives, and leaving millions more homeless. Three thousand miles away, Jacqueline Florestant mourns the presumed death of her parents, while her husband, a former US Marine and combat veteran, cares for their daughter as he fights his own battles with acute PTSD. Horrified and guilt-ridden, Jacqueline returns to Haiti in search of the proverbial “closure.” Her quest turns into a tornado of deception, desperation, ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2017-10-16By The Rumpus Book Club
  • Chinatown Art Brigade Protests Omer Fast’s “Racist” Exhibition at James Cohan Gallery
    Members of Chinatown Art Brigade and other protesters taking over the front room of James Cohan Gallery, which was transformed to appear like a poorly maintained Chinatown business. (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic)On Sunday, October 15, dozens of protesters from the Chinatown Art Brigade (CAB) and other local art and anti-gentrification activist groups converged on James Cohan Gallery’s Chinatown location to object to what they are calling “racist art.” The allegation comes after Omer Fast’s new exhibition, August, constructed a caricature of a derelict Chinatown business that visitors walk through to see the artist’s video work in the backroom. ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-10-16By Hrag Vartanian
  • On Anna Maria Maiolino’s “Entrevidas” (Saturday, September 16, 2017)
    ANNA MARIA MAIOLINO will perform a piece from 1981, Entrevidas, with her grandson, Gabriel, at 7:00 in the evening. The performance will occur during the opening of a retrospective of her work at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the first in the United States to feature the Brazilian artist, whose work combines the minimal with the surreal, everyday life and the uncanny, in a range of materials. Beneath Nancy Rubins’s sculpture of airplane parts permanently installed on the Brutalist concrete expanse of the upper plaza of the museum, hundreds of white ovoid forms dot a large rectangular ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2017-10-16By Cord Brooks
  • STRIPPERDADDY
    As I flipped through my CD case, I asked my nineteen-year-old self, “Self, which CD should you chose for your first job as a stripper?” I was visiting home in Chicago from school, on my bedroom floor in the nook between my bed and the windows so I could smoke. After a few more puffs of my cigarette, I narrowed down my choice to Lil’ Kim’s Hard Core and Foxy Brown’s Ill Na Na. In the late 90s and early aught’s Brooklyn’s Foxy Brown and Lil’ Kim dominated female hip-hop with horny-ass lyrics and their boss-bitch looks. Most often dressed ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2017-10-16By Arch Jamjun