Culture Blog


Welcome to the Culture Blog, a comprehensive feed of engaging content, featuring work form over fifty leading sites on the topics of literature, art, photography, and film.

While this is something of a departure from the specifics of short fiction, we believe it’s important to acknowledge the intersection of the arts and appreciate that many of the best creations come from the blending of ideas.

We hope you’ll find things that will inform, entertain, and inspire.


  • Stuart Hall’s Voice: Intimations of an Ethics of Receptive Generosity – David Scott
    For several generations to come Stuart Hall’s voice will remain a key part of conversations on the left. ...
    Source: Full StopPublished on 2017-08-19By Michael Schapira
  • Exploring Turkey’s Political Crises Through Symbols of Byzantine Supremacy
    Viron Erol Vert, “Long Live Your Balls” (2017) (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic)BERLIN — Born in the Purple, currently on view at Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien, is an exhibition by Berlin and Istanbul–based artist Viron Erol Vert. The show unfolds through many different rooms, creating a bizarre ambiance reminiscent of a family home where patterns, everyday objects, photographs, books, and melodies are collaged into large-scale installations. Shoes must be taken off before entering the first room, where viewers walk through carpeted floors and Turkish rugs lit by shiny, ostentatious chandeliers, while fragments of Nina Simone’s “Strange Fruit” emanate from another ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-08-18By Lucia Hinojosa
  • Origami Animals Bound Across Walls in Murals by ‘Annatomix’ 
    Annatomix, a self-taught painter from Birmingham UK, creates geometric, origami-inspired animals on everyday materials of all sizes. Bumblebees and rabbits take shape on small surfaces like discarded paper bags and wood scraps, while foxes and peregrine falcons scale the sides of buildings. Crafted in acrylic and spray paint, pastels, graphite, and ink, her animal renderings balance a fantastical element while also responding to the environment they are painted into. The artist’s lifelong interest in science, history, religion and philosophy have lead to her current body of work, which is “centered on nature of science and its connection with spirituality. ...
    Source: ColossalPublished on 2017-08-18By Laura Staugaitis
  • An App that Lets Blind People Experience the Solar Eclipse
    Interacting with one of Eclipse Soundscape’s Rumble Maps (photo by Jake Silby for Hyperallergic)This coming Monday, millions of people across the United States will enjoy a rare opportunity to observe a total solar eclipse — or, at least, a partial one, for those unable to situate themselves within the 2017 path of totality. But the astronomical phenomenon is much less accessible to many others, beyond reasons like distance, travel cost, or work; for the blind, it may seem impossible to experience. A new, free mobile app aims to dispel that notion by allowing the blind and visually impaired to witness ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-08-18By Claire Voon
  • Seeking “Notable San Francisco” Blogger!
    The Rumpus is seeking a new Notable San Francisco blogger! Notable San Francisco is a popular weekly column highlighting literary events around the Bay Area. Ideally, our Notable San Francisco blogger lives in the city (or surrounding areas), and is already familiar with the literary scene and events happening around the Bay. We are looking for someone available to start immediately. If you are interested in this opening, please email marisa@therumpus.net with “Notable San Francisco” in the title, and include a few sentences about why you’re interested and any relevant experience. Please note this is a volunteer position. Related Posts: Notable San ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2017-08-18By Marisa Siegel
  • Queens Museum Cancels, Then Reinstates Israel-Sponsored Event After Accusations of Antisemitism
    The Queens Museum (photo via modesto/Flickr and used under CC BY 2.0 license)Earlier this week, the Queens Museum cancelled an on-site event organized by Israeli officials to commemorate the 70th anniversary of their nation’s founding. Now the celebration is back on the schedule, following a decision by the institution yesterday, after swift backlash from many — including Israeli and New York politicians — who accused the museum of antisemitism. While Israel and the museum have seemingly made peace, the situation brings up concerns that this turn of events may set a precarious precedent for how museums conduct business — particularly in light ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-08-18By Claire Voon
  • New York City, August 17, 2017
    ★★★★ Clouds slowed the onset of daylight, but once the sun got clear it was dazzling to stand out in. The breezes were impeccable, though. The five-year-old ran down the sidewalk on the shady side of the avenue, kicking up his heels. Cool shadows were everywhere in the afternoon, and the breeze strengthened till it was muttering in the ears. ...
    Source: The AwlPublished on 2017-08-18By tscocca
  • What to Read When You Want to See a World More F**ked up Than Ours
    We’re currently living in a world where actual Nazi parades—flags, salutes, literal torches—are happening, and I sometimes feel frivolous turning to fiction. But at the same time, fiction often offers a mirror to see our own times more clearly. So here are reading suggestions for these fucked-up times: worlds more—or, okay, just differently—fucked up than ours. It’s not a coincidence that all the books below are written by women and/or people of color: after all, ask most women and people of color and they’ll tell you that the hate being espoused in recent marches has been with us all along. ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2017-08-18By Celeste Ng
  • Gazing at Wholeness: Jacqueline Woodson’s “Another Brooklyn”
    “THIS IS MEMORY.” The phrase echoes through Another Brooklyn, Jacqueline Woodson’s National Book Award–longlisted prose poem of a novel (reprinted last May in paperback). “This is memory,” August, the book’s narrator, says in the opening paragraphs, as she reflects on her childhood and how it might have been different. “This is memory,” she says later, when discussing the bond between her and her trio of childhood friends. “This is memory,” she repeats toward the book’s end, as she describes returning to her birthplace of Tennessee for the first time. On its surface, Another Brooklyn is a coming-of-age story set in ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2017-08-18By Cord Brooks
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson: “Because of Pink Floyd, I’ve Spent Decades Undoing the Idea That There’s a Dark Side of the Moon”
    In 1973, Pink Floyd released their influential concept album, The Dark Side of the Moon, which garnered both critical and commercial success. The album sold some 45 million copies, and remained on Billboard's Top LPs & Tapes chart for 741 weeks (from 1973 to 1988). All of which was great for Pink Floyd. But not so much for science and education. As Neil deGrasse Tyson explains above. "That Pink Floyd had an album with that title meant I spent decades having to undo [that fact] as an educator." That's because "there is no dark side of the moon." "There's a far side and ...
    Source: Open CulturePublished on 2017-08-18By Dan Colman
  • Senator Cory Booker Will Introduce Bill to Remove Confederate Statues from US Capitol
    The US Capitol’s National Statuary Hall (courtesy US Capitol/Wikimedia Commons)Cory Booker, a Democratic Senator from New Jersey, plans to introduce a bill calling for the removal of all Confederate statues from the US Capitol building in Washington, DC. “I will be introducing a bill to remove Confederate statues from the US Capitol building,” he tweeted Wednesday evening. “This is just one step. We have much work to do.” The announcement came the day after President Trump publicly bemoaned the removal of Confederate monuments. Edward V. Valentine’s Statue of Robert E. Lee in its former location at National Statuary Hall (photo ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-08-18By Benjamin Sutton
  • Quiz: Which Fictional Antihero Is Your Soulmate?
    You already know a happily-ever-after isn’t your speed. Which antihero would you end up with? ...
    Source: Book RiotPublished on 2017-08-18By Susie Rodarme
  • Seeking Escape in Paintings of a Childhood Home
    Brandi Twilley, “Smokey on the Yellow Chair” (2016), oil on canvas, 46 x 62 inches (all photos courtesy Sargent’s Daughters gallery and the artist)Brandi Twilley’s paintings in the current exhibition, Where the Fire Started, at Sargent’s Daughters have already garnered significant praise. John Yau, for example, skillfully made the case for the honesty of the work and its lack of sentimentality. The paintings, which mainly feature the home Twilley grew up in until it burnt to the ground when she was 16, depict windows in a subtly astute manner. They function as portals in curious ways: they indicate the painter’s glimpse ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2017-08-18By Seph Rodney
  • Make Them Believe
    Make Them Believe is a documentary exploring Moscow’s underground wrestling scene through the eyes of one up-and-coming performer. Follow Tim Malster’s journey (who plays the heel ‘American Hope’) as he chases his dream of becoming a professional wrestler. In this unexpectedly relatable film, director Taimi Arvidson tackles the universal struggle of the pursuit of a dream. The post Make Them Believe appeared first on Film Shortage. ...
    Source: Film ShortagePublished on 2017-08-18By Admin
  • The Entire President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities Just Resigned
    The committee, which includes author Jhumpa Lahiri, sent a coded message in its resignation letterJhumpa Lahiri, a (now former) member of the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities. (Credit)Citing the president’s unwillingness to unequivocally condemn white supremacists and Nazis, 16 of the 17 members of the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities have resigned en masse. The advisory committee, appointed by President Obama, hasn’t met under Trump, perhaps because he is actively hostile to their work. (Honorary chair Melania Trump, who did not sign the letter of resignation, also doesn’t seem very motivated by art; we’ll refrain from ...
    Source: Electric LiteraturePublished on 2017-08-18By Electric Literature