Culture Blog


Welcome to the Culture Blog, a comprehensive feed of engaging content, featuring work form over fifty leading sites on the topics of literature, art, photography, and film.

While this is something of a departure from the specifics of short fiction, we believe it’s important to acknowledge the intersection of the arts and appreciate that many of the best creations come from the blending of ideas.

We hope you’ll find things that will inform, entertain, and inspire.


  • Get up Joe
    With Joe’s marriage falling apart and the opportunity for greatness again finally within reach, Joe “The Soldier” Andrews is in for the fight of his life. His only obstacles are his wife, a string of past failures, and the World Boxing Champion, “Mad Dog.” With all odds stacked against him, can Joe overcome it all, and become the true champion? The post Get up Joe appeared first on Film Shortage. ...
    Source: Film ShortagePublished on 2018-05-25By Admin
  • The Dark Resurgence: A Star Wars Story
    When the Galactic Empire falls, an old Sith Empire emerges from the shadows and appoints Lord Vycus to lead an outer-rim coalition against the rebellion. When Lord Vycus’ coalition is defeated, he escapes to a distant world awaiting reinforcements from the Dark Council. Instead of sending reinforcements, the Dark Council betrays him and shares his location with the rebellion. Director’s Statement The inception of this film began back in late 2015. When “The Force Awakens” was released, my drive to make “The Dark Resurgence” grew. Before embarking on pre-production, I watched a ton of fan films online. After sifting through ...
    Source: Film ShortagePublished on 2018-05-25By Admin
  • Artists in Santiago Rediscover and Redefine Chile After Years of Relative Isolation
    Elías Adasme at Galería Isabel Aninat, Santiago (all photos by Elisa Wouk Almino for Hyperallergic)SANTIAGO, Chile — During a recent weekend in the Chilean capital, the same anecdotes were repeated to me over and over again. The city, people told me, is very isolated: bordered by the Andes mountains to the east, neighbors with the Arctic penguins to the south, and, to the west, are thousands of miles of Pacific Ocean. But it is not only Chile’s geography that has isolated it. In 1973, the country underwent a military coup (encouraged, like so many South American dictatorships, by the United ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-05-24By Elisa Wouk Almino
  • Unpacking the Legacy of an Indigenous Uprising in Norway
    Installation view of Let the River Flow. The Sovereign Will and the Making of a New Worldliness (photo by Herman Dreyer, courtesy OCA)OSLO — Within the circular arrangement of artworks that makes up the current exhibition at the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA), under the staircase, a wool curtain in the colors of the Sámi flag opens to a cozy, dark space with reindeer hide laid out on the floor. The space is meant to evoke a lavvu, a temporary dwelling used by the Sámi (indigenous people of Northern Europe), it reminds me of the Native American tipi. Inside ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-05-24By Karen Gardiner
  • My Son’s Tutu
    When I was a little kid, I used to ride around my block shirtless on my Big Wheel—until one of the neighbors complained to my mom that it wasn’t appropriate. She made me wear a halter top, but I would ditch it behind some shrubs as soon as she was out of sight. I didn’t fit in, but perhaps as a concession to my desire to be “one of the boys,” she finally bought me a T-shirt that said, “I can beat up any boy on the block.” Needless to say, adolescence was a nightmare. When my mom realized that ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2018-05-24By Allyson McCabe
  • Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Acquires 34 Works by Outsider Artists and a Basquiat Sells for $45.3M at Phillips
    Purvis Young, “Untitled book page” (1983), found book with drawings glued to cover and interior, ballpoint pen, marker, paint on paper, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; Adolph D. and Wilkins C. Williams fund and partial gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation (photo by Dan Jurgens; © Estate of Purvis Young / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York)Transactions is a weekly collection of sales, acquisitions, and other deals. Subscribe to receive these posts as part of the weekly Art Movements newsletter. Jesse Aaron, “Untitled” (early 1970s), wood, popsicle stick, doll’s eyes, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; Adolph D. and Wilkins C. Williams ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-05-24By Benjamin Sutton
  • On Raymond Carver’s Birthday, a Modern-Day “Cathedral”
    Rounding out short story month, we have a particular treat for you. This May 25th marks the eightieth anniversary of the birth of Raymond Carver, one of America’s most celebrated short fiction writers, and to honor the occasion, as a kind of literary birthday present, we’re giving you a fantastic online freebie. Sonya Larson’s contribution to our first ever Emerging Authors issue (ASF 65, Summer 2017), “The Kindest,” carries strong formal and thematic echoes of Carver’s famous story, “Cathedral.” In each story, an uneasy couple is paid an (at least partially) unwelcome visit by an outsider. As the action, if ...
    Source: American Short FictionPublished on 2018-05-24By ASF Editors
  • Reading and Wrestling with Philip Roth
    Alexandra Schwartz on how arguing with Philip Roth is one of the pleasures of reading him. ...
    Source: The New YorkerPublished on 2018-05-24By Alexandra Schwartz
  • Morocco With A Baby And A Sketchbook
    The post Morocco With A Baby And A Sketchbook appeared first on Hyperallergic. ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-05-24By Steven Weinberg
  • A Colorful Medley of Inventive Type Animations Puts the Alphabet in Motion
     Each year the project 36 Days of Type invites graphic designers, illustrators, typographers, and artists from around the world to submit their own alphabet-based designs during a 36-day typographical marathon. Designer Ben Huynh submitted animated letters for each day of the open call which he combined into a short film. The video presents his three-dimensional type in the form of Mephis-style office supplies, modern furniture, and abstract neon light installations, all set to the song “Sunshine” by Gym and Swim. Submissions for this years 36 Days of Type ended earlier this month. You can see all of the alphabetical selections from this ...
    Source: ColossalPublished on 2018-05-24By Kate Sierzputowski
  • The Rumpus Mini-interview Project #137: Aimee Nezhukumatathil
    In Oceanic, Aimee Nezhukumatathil envisions a world that recalls Ariel’s “rich and strange” fathoms in The Tempest—depths of water or being brimming with strangeness, with life. Sea creatures and human subjects are interchangeable, sometimes via metaphor, sometimes beyond metaphor’s comparative distances. Nezhukumatathil mines the title for its many meanings: in these poems, “oceanic” by turns indicates vastness, depth, profundity, inclusiveness. It is also a narrative of immense love. Reading Oceanic, I felt renewed wonder at nature’s immensities—not an expected feeling, I later reflected, in our ecological and political moment. Yet “wonder,” a term so often found in responses to Nezhukumatahil’s ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2018-05-24By KB Kinkel
  • One Man’s Quixotic Quest to Walk Every Mile of New York City
    Matt Green in The World Before Your Feet (photograph by Michael Berman)How well do you know your city? Likely it’s not as intimately as Matt Green knows New York. The feature-length documentary The World Before Your Feet begins in the South Bronx on his 1,258th day of walking the five boroughs,  a quixotic quest that he estimates will cover 8,000 miles of sidewalks, roads, parks, cemeteries, beaches, and abandoned lots. Yet he’s in no hurry, as he ambles and chats with locals, and notices the minutiae that most of us overlook, from the metal bristles left behind by street cleaners, to DIY ...
    Source: HyperallergicPublished on 2018-05-24By Allison Meier
  • Jury Announced for the 2019 NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature
    News and Events WLT World Literature Today, the award-winning magazine of international literature and culture, has announced who the jury members will ...
    Source: World Literature TodayPublished on 2018-05-24By robvollmar@ou.edu
  • Voices on Addiction: Spontaneous Combustion
    My mother rises in a red and blue double helix of flame through my body. I can feel the DNA wires of her inside me, hot, hot, grape-vining up from my big toe to my skull and going back again in a never-ending loop, her blazing colonization. She made me. When I was one-celled, the power and rhythm of her youth and hope—life—was the force that split me in two, what doubled me over and over until I was a floating zygote in a sac-shaped tissue bag, with nary any skeleton, but with a brain and the all-important beating heart. ...
    Source: The RumpusPublished on 2018-05-24By Jane Eaton Hamilton
  • The New Primitives
    THE IDEA FOR the Na’vi, the made-up humanoid species indigenous to the planet Pandora in James Cameron’s 2009 primitivist blockbuster Avatar, came to the director via his mother. In the 1970s, she told her son about a dream of a 12-foot blue woman, and this formed the basis for the brief he would deliver to his designers 30 years later. The Na’vi were to be blue, tall, muscular, sleek, and feline. They had to be alien enough to be plausibly otherworldly, but take a form, the concept artist Jordu Schell recalled Cameron stipulating, that “the audience has to want to ...
    Source: Los Angeles Review of BooksPublished on 2018-05-24By Cord Brooks